Circumpolar Arctic Film Festival

The Circumpolar Arctic Film Festival will bring together films from across the Arctic related to:

  • Sustainable Cities and Communities
  • Climate Action
  • Clean and Affordable Energy
  • Good Health and Well-Being

Films are open to North by North participants, Museum Passholders, or by registering for the NxN Festival.

Submissions still being accepted at https://filmfreeway.com/NorthxNorthFilmFestival 

Film Festival Schedule

 

 

Thursday, April 26, 2018

The Other Side of Hope

7:30 p.m. in the auditorium

Run Time:  1hr 30 min

Directed by by Aki Kaurismäki, Finland, 2017

Language: Finnish, English, and Arabic with English Subtitles

Open to North X North registrants and public, free with admission

Displaced Syrian Khaled lands in Helsinki as a stowaway; meanwhile, middle-aged salesman Wikström leaves behind his wife and job and buys a conspicuously unprofitable seafood restaurant. After Khaled is denied asylum, he decides not to return to Aleppo—and the paths of the two men cross fortuitously. As deadpan as the best of director Aki Kaurismäki’s work, and with a deep well of empathy for its down-but-not-out, The Other Side of Hope is a bittersweet tale of human kindness in the face of official indifference.

 

Friday, April 27, 2018

Three Thousand

Noon to 6 p.m. on atrium screens, looped

Run Time:  14 min

Directed by Asinnajaq, Canada, 2017

Language:

Open to North X North registrants and public, free with admission

Inuk artist Asinnajaq plunges us into a sublime imaginary universe14 minutes of luminescent, archive-inspired cinema that recast the past, present and future of Inuit in a radiant new light. Embedding historic footage into original animation, she conjures up a vision of hope and beautiful possibility.

 

Between Earth and Sky

Noon in the ConocoPhillips Gallery, 2nd floor

Run Time:  1hr 25 min

Directed by Paul Hunton, USA

Language: English

Open to North X North registrants and public, free with admission

Alaska has been the source of myth and legend in the imagination of Americans for centuries, and what was once the last frontier of American expansion, has become the first frontier in climate change. Between Earth and Sky examines climate change through the lens of impacts to native Alaskans, receding glaciers, and arctic soil.

 

Keep Talking

2:00 p.m. in the ConocoPhillips Gallery, 2nd floor

Run Time:  1 hr 20 min

Directed by Karen Weinberg, USA, 2017

Language: English, Finnish

Open to North X North registrants and public, free with admission

Keep Talking follows four Alaska Native women fighting to save Kodiak Alutiiq, an endangered language now spoken by less than 40 remaining fluent Native Elders. Their small community travels to remote Afognak Island to start teaching kids Alutiiq. Keep Talking reveals the ultimate impact of language and culture revitalization; joy and hope.

 

The Illuminators

3:30 p.m. in the ConocoPhillips Gallery, 2nd floor

Run Time:  1 hr 8 min

Directed by Antti Haase, Finland, 2017

Language: English, Finnish

Open to North X North registrants and public, free with admission

The story of a Baltic German refugee who became the father of light to Lapland, The Illuminators recounts how Lapland was electrified by an enormous undertaking and a courageous mission.

Director Antti Haase and cinematographer Mikko Leinonen will be present for Q&A after the film.

 

WE UP:  Indigenous Hip Hop in the Circumpolar North

7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. in the Auditorium

Runtime: 30 min, followed by curated conversation

Directed by David Holthouse, USA, 2018

Language: English, Northern Sámi, Inari Sámi,  Iñupiaq

Open to North X North registrants and public, free with admission

Forty years after hip-hop culture was born in the South Bronx district of New York City, its foundational creative forms, or “four elements,” are taking on new life with indigenous artists of the Circumpolar North. These rappers, breakdancers, graffiti artists and turn-tablists (DJs) hail from places throughout Arctic nations, from reindeer herding villages in northern Finland and Norway, to Nuuk, the capital of Greenland, to communities large and small in Northern Canada and Alaska. Though separated by long distances, they are unified by common elements and recurring themes: connections to ancestral land, defense of hunting and fishing rights, loss of language, climate change and the continuing aftermath of colonization. By grafting indigenous languages, rhythms, movements and storytelling traditions onto styles designed for reinvention, these indigenous artists are putting their own spin on the radical self-expression, celebration of home, and keen social commentary that hip-hop represents. A pre-production screening with discussion following.

 

When They Awake

8:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. in the Auditorium

Run Time:  1 hr 30 min

Directed by PJ Marcellino and Hermon Farahi, Canada/USA, 2017

Language: English, Inuktitut

Open to North X North registrants and public, free with admission

When They Awake documents a remarkable generation of established and emerging Indigenous musicians in a moment of cultural and political resurgence across North America — from Standing Rock to the largest music stages. Featuring 20+ artists, from legendary songstress Buffy Sainte-Marie to modern trailblazers like Tanya Tagaq, Iskwé, Leela Gilday, and A Tribe Called Red, When They Awake is a magnum opus to the contemporary Indigenous music scene, and to the social movement that it’s helping build. Working in every genre from Hip Hop to Rock to EDM and beyond, this crop of native musicians is channeling the pain of the past into a stirring, hopeful vision of the future.

 

Saturday, April 28, 2018

Melting Church

12 to 6 p.m. on Atrium screens, looped

Created by Andreas Hoffmann, 2017, Norway

The Melting Church is a time-lapsed documentation of a public art project, placed in Kjøllefjord, in the Arctic part of Norway, from February to May 2017.

Children of the Arctic

Noon in the ConocoPhillips Gallery, 2nd floor

Directed by Nick Brandestini, USA, 2014

Runtime: 1 hr 30 min

Language: English, Iñupiat

Open to North X North registrants and public, free with admission

At the Arctic edge of America, Native Alaskan teenagers strive to be both modern American kids and the inheritors of an endangered whaling culture.

Children of the Arctic is a year-in-the-life portrait of Native Alaskan teenagers coming of age in Barrow, Alaska – the northern-most community of the United States. For these teenagers growing up has “Ukpiagvik” (“where we hunt snowy owls”). They are the twenty-first century descendants of a culture that has endured for millennia on this isolated, but rapidly changing tundra. The harvest of the agvik (bowhead whale) remains the heart of their culture – in the fall, motor boats and modern methods are used, whereas, in the spring, whaling crews use the umiaq (a seal-skin boat made by hand) and ancient traditional methods.

Angry Inuk

2:00 p.m. in the ConocoPhillips Gallery, 2nd floor

Directed by Alethea Arnaquq-Baril, 2017, Canada

Runtime: 1 hr 30 min

Language: English, Inuktitut

Open to North X North registrants and public, free with admission

Director Alethea Arnaquq-Baril joins a new tech-savvy generation of Inuit as they campaign to challenge long-established perceptions of seal hunting. Armed with social media and their own sense of humour and justice, this group is bringing its own voice into the conversation and presenting themselves to the world as a modern people in dire need of a sustainable economy.

Sami Blood

6:30 p.m. in the Auditorium

Directed by Amanda Kernell, Sweden, Norway, Sápmi, 2016

Runtime: 1 hr 50 min

Language: South Sámi, Swedish; English Subtitles

Open to North X North registrants and public, free with admission

Elle Marja, 14, is a reindeer-breeding Sámi girl. Exposed to the racism of the 1930’s and race biology examinations at her boarding school, she starts dreaming of another life. To achieve this other life, she has to become someone else and break all ties with her family and culture. Film discussion led by Melissa Shaginoff & Aaron Leggett

Sunday, April 29, 2018

Three Thousand

Noon to 5 p.m. on atrium screens, looped

Run Time:  14 min

Directed by Asinnajaq, Canada, 2017

Open to North X North registrants and public, free with admission

Inuk artist Asinnajaq plunges us into a sublime imaginary universe14 minutes of luminescent, archive-inspired cinema that recast the past, present and future of Inuit in a radiant new light. Embedding historic footage into original animation, she conjures up a vision of hope and beautiful possibility.

Journeys to Adäka 

Noon in the Conoco Phillips Gallery, 2nd Floor

Run Time:  1 hour

Directed by Fritz Mueller, Canada, 2017

Language: English

Open to North X North registrants and public, free with admission

Journeys to Adäka is the story of seven indigenous artists who look to the past for the strength to overcome a legacy of hurt, becoming cultural giants and leaders in the process. This documentary follows its subjects as they prepare for the Adäka Cultural Festival in Whitehorse, Yukon, inviting viewers into carving sheds, kitchens, and community halls.

Camera Trap

1 p.m. in the Conoco Phillips Gallery, 2nd Floor

Run Time:  30 min

Directed by Marty O’Brien, Canada, 2017

Language: English

The Porcupine Caribou herd is one of the largest caribou herds in North America but its future is uncertain. Climate change, industrial development, national and international political posturing and a rapidly changing north are all putting the herd and its home range at risk. The Gwich’in people who have relied on the herd for generations also see their future hanging in the balance and they need the rest of the world to notice. Camera Trap is an intimate portrait of Photographer Peter Mather, exploring what is behind his obsession with protecting the Porcupine herd and the lengths he will go to get the perfect shot.

 

Voices of Northwest Alaska: Sea Ice Secure

1:30 p.m. in the Conoco Phillips Gallery, 2nd Floor

Run Time:  15 minutes

Directed by Sarah Betcher, USA, 2017

Language: English

Open to North X North registrants and public, free with admission

People in rural northwest Alaska show strong resilience to the impacts of climate change. Sea Ice Secure showcases ways in which local people find adaptive ways to go about their subsistence way of life in the wake of rapid change in sea ice conditions.

 

Voices of Northwest Alaska: Grocery Store of the People

1:45 p.m. in the Conoco Phillips Gallery, 2nd Floor

Run Time:  16 minutes

Directed by Sarah Betcher, USA, 2017

Language: English

Open to North X North registrants and public, free with admission

Rural subsistence communities of the Northwest Alaskan Arctic rely on wild foods to sustain economic and cultural well-being. Grocery Store of Our People showcases the many strengths of the Inupiaq people’s subsistence way of life.

 

Breathe In

2:15 p.m. in the Conoco Phillips Gallery, 2nd Floor

Run Time:  16 minutes

Directed by Fransisco Mattos, Norway, 2018

Language: English

Open to North X North registrants and public, free with admission

World Champion kiter Kari Schibevaag and four colleagues embark on a 15-day long expedition to cross Svalbard from the south to the north. They want to document climate changes and explore the arctic nature while using the power of the wind and kites to move. The team face extreme conditions and dangers, from glacier cracks to securing their camp sites in areas inhabited by polar bears.

 

Keep Talking

3:00 p.m. in the ConocoPhillips Gallery, 2nd floor

Run Time:  1 hr 20 min

Directed by Karen Weinberg, USA

Language: English, Finnish

Open to North X North registrants and public, free with admission

Keep Talking follows four Alaska Native women fighting to save Kodiak Alutiiq, an endangered language now spoken by less than 40 remaining fluent Native Elders. Their small community travels to remote Afognak Island to start teaching kids Alutiiq. Keep Talking reveals the ultimate impact of language and culture revitalization; joy and hope.